Annual Conference of the Institute for Social Movement Studies (IPB)

We warmly welcome you to the annual conference of the Institute for Social Movement Studies. Together with the Weizenbaum Institute for the Networked Society, the Center for Technology and Society and the Jena Institute for Democracy and Civil Society, we are proud to bring together up-tothe-minute research, activist voices and civil society initiatives that deal with the challenges and opportunities for protest and movements in the digital age.

Today, protest and counter-protest, rule and resistance can only be thought of in the context of a digitized society, its particular opportunities, dynamics and challenges. Digital interactions change our social relationships and thus also the form and functioning of social movements and protests. The digital context allows mobilizations to be initiated with less organizational effort and far more reach. However, we have become aware of other downsides of digital organization: digital hate cultures, surveillance and digital repression challenge the prospects of emancipatory change transnationally.

What is the perspective of social movement research on these crucial points? With this conference, we want to initiate a discussion on the changing protest landscape that interacts between the personal and public, micro-action and macro-repercussions, online and offline behavior that are all tied-up in contemporary politics. We are featuring 16 panels, a keynote plenary and a closing plenary stretching from empowerment to repression, from hate to hope and from the global to the local – and back.

We welcome speakers from five different continents creating a space for a truly international experience. For the first time, the annual conference is held in English as the basic language. However, we made sure that each slot involves one German-speaking panel. Our program includes advanced academics, early career researchers, activists, students, artists and interested citizens. It is our aim to create an inspiring space for everyone and to cross-fertilize our knowledge with mutual respect and solidarity.

 

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